An international coalition of scientists is urging governments to ban the sale of electronic waste to countries around the world.

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has also called on countries to do the same, warning that the use of electronic goods to produce goods, such as mobile phones and laptops, poses a serious threat to the environment.UNEP’s report warns that electronic waste is increasingly being used as an energy source in the developing world, with some products used as a substitute for renewable energy.

The report says: “We must be able to identify and prevent the use, or to mitigate the impact of, the production of these products, without imposing a price on the use and sale of such products.”

It recommends that countries regulate and restrict the sale and use of these electronic products.

The main environmental group is also calling for the European Union to set a national maximum price on electronic waste.

The report states that there are currently around 1.2 billion pieces of electronic wastes in use around the globe, and that about 2 billion tonnes of this waste is generated in the world every year.”

The market needs to work on finding the best way to make the most of the opportunities in this area.”

The report states that there are currently around 1.2 billion pieces of electronic wastes in use around the globe, and that about 2 billion tonnes of this waste is generated in the world every year.

O’Brien said:”In the developed world, this amounts to around 80% of the global electronic waste.”

He said the EU should set a minimum price for these products.

“It is also important to set an overall minimum price to be able for governments to determine what is appropriate,” he said.

The UNEP report recommends that governments establish a national limit on the amount of electronic and other waste that can be exported from their countries.

It also recommends that international trade bodies such as the International Trade Union Confederation and the International Solid Waste Management Association be set up to monitor and regulate the global trade in these products and ensure they comply with the international trade agreements that the EU has signed.

It said: “As a matter of urgency, the EU must also set up a national minimum price on all such waste and its related products, including electronic and related products used in the manufacture of these goods.”

A UK government spokesman said: